Motorola Droid RAZR Maxx Revealed as High Battery Capacity RAZR

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Back at the beginning of December, we broke news of the name Droid RAZR Maxx for one of Motorola’s upcoming smartphones. We didn’t have much more than some EXIF data to go on, but did see one unconfirmed report from a Verizon user who claimed to have been told by a retail employee that the RAZR Maxx was basically going to be a slightly-thicker RAZR with the benefit of a higher-capacity battery. Even a minor change to the phone seemed like a surprising development, considering how little time had passed since the Droid RAZR was first introduced. Sure enough, though, Verizon and Motorola have now confirmed the RAZR Maxx as just such an extended-life RAZR.

The original Droid RAZR features a 1780mAh battery. The larger component in the RAZR Maxx bumps total capacity up to 3300mAh. With that kind of juice, Motorola says you should expect about 21 hours of talk time on a single charge. On standby, you might even see a charge hold for fifteen days straight.

The RAZR is renowned for its thinness; what kind of toll does the new battery take on the phone’s profile? While the original model measured-in as slim as 7.1 millimeters, the RAZR Maxx is just a hair under 9 millimeters thick. Ultimately, we’re still dealing with a quite thin smartphone even with this larger battery.

Sales should begin “in the coming weeks”, with the new RAZR Maxx demanding just about $300 on-contract. You should also see the original RAZR’s price drop to $200.

Source: Motorola

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!