Sony Ericsson LT26i Nozomi Gets Hands-On Preview, Benchmarked

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A little earlier today, we shared with you the latest clue Sony Ericsson’s made available about what hardware it will be revealing at next week’s CES. Is the subway setting a reference to Metro – another Windows Phone hint? Could the “190” be referencing something? While we continue to look forward to your theories in the comments over in that post, what we’ve got here is some Sony Ericsson news that requires very little guesswork, as a source has managed to get his hands on the company’s Nozomi handset a little early for some benchmarking and whole lot of new pics.

We’ve heard that codename Nozomi may refer to the ultimately to be known as the Xperia Arc HD; here, the phone is simply called the Xperia HD. We’ve heard plenty about the phone’s hardware before, and this most recent hands-on confirms many of those specs. Numbers like a 1.5GHz dual-core processor, 1GB of RAM, a 12-megapixel primary camera, and a 720p display are all figures with which we’re familiar. Still, there are some surprises here, like the phone’s reported storage capacity. We had already heard that there’d be no microSD expansion, which is confirmed here, but that the phone would be available in 16GB and 32GB configurations; here, it’s only 8GB. With any luck, full details on all the different configurations Sony Ericsson plans to make available will be disclosed early next week.

nozomi bench

Though shown here with only one core active, the Nozomi has a dual-core processor

Source: IT Pro Portal

Via: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!