OPMOSH Demands Motorola Bootloader Answers

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Many of us who choose Android as our smartphone platform of preference do so because of the nearly open-ended flexibility offered through all the avenues that exist to customize your phone. For a certain segment of users, that means custom ROMs. As a result, when shopping for a new phone, you might end up paying special attention to the phone’s bootloader status. A locked (or rather, well-locked) bootloader can seriously get in the way of your ability to later install custom software. This year, we saw some progress towards granting users greater control over their Androids, with HTC starting a bootloader unlocking program that targets a good number of its phones, with a still-growing list. On the flip side, there’s Motorola and its current indifference towards the bootloader issue, which is starting to generate some organized backlash in the form of Operation: Make Ourselves Heard.

Simplified as #OPMOSH, the movement seeks to hold Motorola accountable for earlier statements it’s made that indicated it would have a bootloader unlocking system of its own before the end of last year. As some customers relied on that promise when making their purchasing decisions, they’re rightfully upset at the missing feature.

#OPMOSH seeks to use a communication campaign to target the FCC as well as Motorola directly. The goal here is to force Motorola into some sort of action in regards to that earlier bootloader promise, and let it know that its users simply aren’t going to let things slide. If you’d like to help out, or just add your name to the petition, check out the group’s mission statement and links to its resources through the Source link below.

Source: XDA-Developers

Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!