RIM Insider Casts Doubt on BlackBerry 10 Prospects

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Earlier this month, we shared with you our predictions for the biggest losers in smartphones for 2012. We may have each based our answers on different reasoning, but many of us came to the same conclusion, that RIM is facing a do-or-die situation, and it might not be able to rise to the occasion. Now a RIM insider, supposedly a high-level employee, has spoken out about the company’s work in moving to BlackBerry 10, raising doubts about its progress and calling into question whether it’s the right move for RIM.

According to the insider, BlackBerry 10 has yet to evolve beyond the state of the latest PlayBook OS, meaning no integration with e-mail and no BlackBerry Messenger. For a company that’s built its reputation with such a focus on messaging, RIM may be forgetting its roots as it makes decisions affecting BlackBerry 10 development.

The source also comments on RIM’s recent announcement that we won’t get to see BlackBerry 10 devices until late 2012, considerably later than we were expecting. Supposedly, this isn’t due to any hardware issues, but instead because BlackBerry 10 simply isn’t working as a platform yet, and RIM is trying to buy itself as much time as possible.

Is all this just a disgruntled employee taking a few shots at his bosses, or is RIM really rushing head-first into BlackBerry 10 without taking the time to first make sure it’s really the right direction the company needs to take?

Source: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!