Original Motorola Droid Gets Work-In-Progress Custom ICS Build

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Earlier this month, we got an official update on the progress towards the next major release of CyanogenMod, now incorporating Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. The news about CM9 wasn’t all good for everyone, as owners of the original “OG” Motorola Droid learned their smartphones would no longer be seeing CyanogenMod support. Considering the phone’s limited hardware, with a pretty severe RAM bottleneck, that shouldn’t have been surprising to hear, though it was unfortunate all the same. Of course, just because the phone won’t get CM9 doesn’t mean that other devs won’t be working on an Ice Cream Sandwich ROM of their own. Such an attempt has recently become available, and while it’s far from being a daily driver, it shows a lot of potential for running on some two-year-old hardware.

Even in such an early state of development, progress is already apparent. Just a few days ago, the touchscreen wasn’t even working, but that’s back online in the latest release. WiFi also just got enabled in the most recent build, and colors finally display correctly. Of course, plenty of things remain broken, like the camera, virtual keyboard, and Bluetooth. The good news is that memory usage isn’t that bad so far, so there’s a lot of room for improvement.

If you’d like to give Ice Cream Sandwich a whirl on your OG Droid (no Milestone support yet), you can download the ROM through the source link below.

Source: XDA-Developers forum

Via: Droid-life

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!