Galaxy Nexus LTE More Affordable Than Expected Off-Contract

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As the first day of Galaxy Nexus sales on Verizon in the States continues, we’re already seeing some big discounts on the phone over the nearly $300 on-contract price Verizon’s asking. What about off-contract pricing, though? Before the phone arrived, we saw plenty of leaked information from retailers suggesting we would be looking at something around $800, which has now been confirmed at the likes of Best Buy upon the start of sales. When Verizon made its announcement of the phone’s arrival last night, it neglected to mention what the carrier itself would be charging for the Galaxy Nexus without contractual obligation. It turns out this is one time you’ll save by going directly through the carrier, with the off-contract phone only demanding about $650.

Considering $650 works out to the $300 base price plus a $350 early termination fee, it makes a whole lot more sense as an off-contract price than the $800 some retailers are asking. Granted, you have a lot fewer options for what you’ll do with your off-contract LTE Galaxy Nexus than you would with the HSPA+ version, but the choice is still there for you.

As far as discounted prices for the on-contract handset go, someone’s already managed to beat the $155 we told you about overnight. Unsurprisingly, it’s Amazon to the rescue, and this time you won’t need to apply any coupons as with the LetsTalk deal. Although the Galaxy Nexus is currently back-ordered, get your order in now and you’ll only pay $150 for the handset.

Source: Verizon, Amazon

Via: Droid Dog, BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!