AT&T Announces LG Nitro HD, Joining LTE Lineup Early Next Month

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LG introduced 720p screens to its smartphone lineup with the introduction of the Optimus LTE, featuring a 4.5-inch HD display. After seeing the phone spread internationally, we got a look at how the Android would arrive in the US, spotting it as the LG Nitro HD for AT&T. Last week, LG sent out invitations to an event scheduled for December 1, and the evidence seemed to make the case for using that event to officially announce the Nitro HD. We’ll learn this Thursday just what LG has been planning, but in the meantime, it looks like AT&T has beaten the manufacturer to the punch, today announcing its plans to carry the LG Nitro HD.

AT&T will begin sales of the Nitro HD next Sunday, December 4. On-contract, the phone will be going for just about $250.

While the AH-IPS 720p screen is a nice-enough component on its own, the rest of the Nitro HD’s features are largely on the same level. Its 1.5GHz dual-core CPU puts it firmly in a “superphone” tier, it includes a full gigabyte of RAM, and for storage there’s both 4GB of internal flash and a 16GB microSD card.

The Nitro HD will clearly appeal to AT&T subscribers currently able to receive LTE service, but we don’t expect a lack of wide LTE deployment to hurt Nitro sales too much; after all, with HSPA+ compatibility, it’s like you’re getting the best of both worlds, and should still see some decent speeds.

Source: AT&T

Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!