What Would You Do in a Real-Life App Store?

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One way that smartphones are really poised to revolutionize the retail sector is the transition from software purchases in brick-and-mortar stores to digital distribution online. Clearly, we’re already there with the smartphone platforms themselves, and we’re seeing the likes of Apple and Microsoft start start to adopt the model for desktop software sales, as well. In this brave new world, what place is there for a retail storefront? One new startup out of Colorado aims to answer that question, opening what very well may be the first app store in the real world.

Openspace has its first (and only) retail location in Boulder, Colorado, where you can stop-in to get some professional help in choosing the right apps for your smartphone. If you know what features you’re interested in, but aren’t having much luck finding the right app amongst the dozens and dozens of competitors, the guys at Openspace are hoping they can push you in the right direction.

The company intends to make money by taking a cut of sales, just like the online app stores, and by offering developers the opportunity to promote their apps directly to Openspace’s customers.

If you don’t need quite the hands-on treatment, but would still like to check out some of the company’s recommendations, visit its website, which features custom app collections accessible through Facebook.

Source: CNET

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!