Adobe Flash for Android Updated; Not Ice Cream Sandwich This Time

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It was just about one month ago when Adobe finally rendered the whole Flash-on-smartphones debate a moot point with the announcement that it was ceasing development of Flash Player for mobile devices. While we wouldn’t be able to look forward to the same level of support from Adobe, the company did promise to continue with security-related and bugfix updates. Then, after we learned that the current build of Flash Player didn’t support Ice Cream Sandwich, Adobe relented and committed to one last release to add Android 4.0 compatibility, promised for this month. We’re not quite there yet, but a new release of Flash Player for Android has snuck out today, with a couple of those fixes Adobe was talking about.

Adobe’s release notes show Flash Player 11.1.111.5 should include some general improvements to video playback stability, as well as fixes for some specific hardware. Samsung’s Galaxy S2 would occasionally run into problems when trying to stream video that would result in proper audio playback, but without the accompanying video; look for it to be fixed with this release.

Considering the lack of hardware at the moment, this is more future-proofing than anything, but Adobe has enabled 1080p support for Android devices built on NVIDIA Tegra 3 chips. That’s an especially promising inclusion, since it shows that Adobe is still very much concerned with how Flash continues to perform on Android hardware, even if there won’t be any additional feature updates.

Source: Adobe

Via: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!