Epic 4G Touch Signal Loss Fix Coming Soon; User Leaks It Early

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Shortly after Sprint got its version of the Samsung Galaxy S II in the form of the Epic 4G Touch, we started hearing from users who were running into all sorts of issues with the radios on their phones, with problems ranging from slow data speeds, to dropped calls, to signal loss requiring a reset. Last week one user complained about loss-of-signal problems to the extent that Sprint and Samsung reached out to him, supposedly detailing their efforts to fix it. Not only was he offered the opportunity to try out the in-testing fix, but he managed to extract it from his phone with the help of some XDA devs, and it’s now available for all to enjoy.

The source of this issue is supposedly with the phone’s modem behavior when it loses signal. During certain cases, if the phone is trying to send data when the signal is lost, it will get confused and not be able to re-connect to the tower. According to the story, a Samsung developer said that the finished update should be headed out to users in December.

Where the story really gets interesting is when this user was sent an upgrade to Android 2.3.6, including a new EK02 radio version. While there was plenty of doubt going around the XDA-Developers forums after he posted that news, he was ultimately able to extract the proper data from his phone in order to offer the update for other Epic 4G Touch users to install. If you’re up for some flashing, all the files you’ll need are available over at the forum now. If not, December isn’t far away, and the rest of you Epic 4G Touch users should be seeing your own OTA updates shortly.

Source: XDA-Developers

Via: Sprintfeed

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!