What’s the Verizon Hologram?

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Keeping an eye on the names that companies in the the smartphone game register for trademark protection can sometimes give us a heads-up as to upcoming devices. Not every name will end up as a product, and it’s not always clear just what sort of device we’re talking about; what sounds like it’s a cool smartphone could end up something quite more banal. The latest to catch our attention is the Hologram, registered by Verizon; what might it be?

The obvious place to go seems to be smartphones with autostereoscopic displays, but would that be a likely release for the carrier? We haven’t exactly seen these no-glasses-required 3D screens blast-off in popularity as phones featuring them became widely available earlier this year, but at the same time they’re not really bombing, either. While Sprint and AT&T have their 3D options in the States, Verizon’s been left out. In that light, we could understand the company wanting to play catch-up, but we’re still unsure if Verizon would even see this specific market niche as one worth pursuing. If the Hologram does end up as a 3D phone, there’s a good chance it will be a re-branded model we’ve already heard about; just which one, though?

What about any other possibilities? The name Hologram evokes a feeling of crisp, technical, high-end imagery; maybe we’re staying in the 2D realm, but just talking about a device with a high-resolution, high-pixel-density display. There are any number of upcoming 720p smartphones that could fit that bill, not to mention tablets.

Any other guesses what Verizon might be planning for the Hologram?

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!