Galaxy Nexus Spotted With Verizon Badging, LTE Model Specs Land

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Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus has arrived, bringing Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich along with it. While shoppers in the UK get their hands on the smartphone, the US still waits to learn of plans for the phone’s release. We don’t have any new rumors of a launch date to share with you right now, but we have gotten a look at the US version of the Galaxy Nexus, complete with Verizon LTE badging, and Google has updated the phone’s listing of tech specs to show us just how the HSPA+ and LTE versions of the handset differ.

Google’s uploaded a whole mess of Galaxy Nexus videos to the phone’s YouTube channel. Yesterday, it added one showing users how to quickly get started with the phone. There are two versions of the video, including one for US audiences that shows off its full Verizon livery.

We knew since the phone’s announcement event that the LTE version of the Galaxy Nexus would be a little chunkier, but just how bad is it? The HSPA+ Nexus measures-in at 8.94-millimeters thick. To accommodate the demands of LTE, the Nexus finds itself growing to a 9.47-millimeter size. That’s not so bad on its own, but the LTE version also packs on a little mass, at 150 grams compared to the HSPA+’s 135 grams. It’s still just a small change, but do these figures have anyone now thinking they might just forget the US launch and try getting their hands on an HSPA+ version of the phone?

Source: Google 1, 2

Via: GSM Arena, Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!