NVIDIA Tegra 3 Chips Will Offer Power-Saving Display Hack

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It seems like every time we bring up the topic of quad-core smartphones, our readers chime-in with their concerns over the battery life of these devices. Given the current state of the struggle between our desires for phones that are simultaneously lightweight, powerful, and long-lasting, those fears aren’t exactly surprising. We’ve heard about some efforts to reduce the power impact of quad-core processors, like NVIDIA adding a fifth, low-power core to its Tegra 3. It turns out that’s not the only trick the company has planned, revealing a display technology called DIDIM that promises to cut-down on backlight power consumption.

DIDIM attempts to extend your battery’s life by not running the display’s backlight at full-blast all the time. Instead, on a frame-by-frame basis, DIDIM will attempt to modulate backlight intensity while simultaneously changing pixel brightness to compensate. With both processes effectively canceling each other out, you should end up with a picture that looks the same as ever, but with less power expended to display it. NVIDIA estimates that you could see a 40% improvement in video playback time compared to Tegra 2 devices.

Obviously there are some limitations to the technology; its very nature means it’s incompatible with AMOLED screens. Still, it sounds great on paper, and we can’t wait to see how it holds up to some real-world testing.

Source: NVIDIA

Via: Android and Me

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!