How Well Are Android Phones Handling 64GB SDXC Memory Cards?

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The arrival of the first 64GB microSD memory cards was tipped earlier this year, and commercial availability of the cards began a couple months back. While cards up to 32GB fall under the SDHC framework, larger sizes are considered SDXC devices. At the time the 64GB cards came out, we wondered about how well smartphones would support the new components. While we haven’t seen much in the way of manufacturers explicitly claiming SDXC compatibility, it turns out that the current crop of Androids is largely right at home using the new, high-capacity cards.

The 64GB cards themselves are pretty uncommon at the moment, and still quite expensive, so it’s not unexpected that we haven’t heard more about users testing the cards with their phones. Those who have put their devices through the ringer found that not only could newer models like the Galaxy Note, Galaxy S II, and Droid RAZR read and write to the 64GB cards just fine, but even the HTC Sensation and the original Galaxy S worked; in fact, it may be more difficult to find an Android where the cards don’t work.

These findings shouldn’t be entirely surprising, as SDXC cards have the same pinout as SDHC, and differ mainly in being formatted so the operating system can access past 32GB. We weren’t sure how nicely Android would play with those larger cards, but these tests look very promising; everything from custom ROMs to stock Froyo was able to format and use the 64GB component. Now, if we could only see the price of those 64GB cards drop to a more reasonable level!

Source: AndroidNZ

Via: Clove

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!