Motorola Planning Droid Project, Two Years After Its Release

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Once in a while, we’ll see a smartphone manufacturer come out with an unexpected update for an aging handset. While we harp on those companies for often taking so long to release updates in the first place, it’s a great feeling when they finally arrive, breathing some new life into old hardware. Past a certain point, though, any sensible person gives up hope of ever seeing official updates released again. If you’ve been feeling that way about a first-gen Motorola Droid you’ve been holding onto, there may be a surprise in your future, as there are signs that Motorola’s got something special planned for the handset.

The Droid came out in October, 2009. Two years is a long time to keep supporting an Android (sadly), and the last major update for the phone arrived all the way back in March of this year.

Recently, though, registered Droid owners who use the Motorola Owners’ Forums have been receiving messages inviting them to take a survey to determine eligibility for participating in a secret Droid project. While there’s no specific mention of a software update, that’s the first place our thoughts go. The Droid has proven itself more than capable of running Gingerbread with custom ROMs; could we see an official release? It could be something as mundane as bugfixes, but the Droid seems like a really odd target for such care at this point in time. Whatever it is, we’re very curious to learn what was interesting enough to turn Motorola’s attention back to the Droid in this day and age.

Source: Droid-life

Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!