US Cellular Reveals Plans For Early 2012 LTE Service

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Two months ago, we received a tip about the Samsung’s SCH-R930, and how it looked like the smartphone might be the first such LTE device on US Cellular’s forthcoming LTE network. While that looked promising, we still lacked a lot of information on the carrier’s specific plans for deploying that network. Today, US Cellular has announced where its LTE service will first be available, covering cities in six states.

We had heard a while back that US Cellular was hoping to get into the LTE game by the end of this year. Now it appears those plans have been delayed, but not by too, too much, with these first LTE markets set to receive service during the first quarter of 2012.

Unlike AT&T’s first stab at LTE, which was concentrated strongly in the Midwest (though now it’s spread to the Baltimore/DC area with plans for NYC announced), US Cellular’s efforts will be a little more dispersed. While we like the idea of spreading things out so more users can have a chance to try the new network, the provided list of initial markets has some odd choices, with Milwaukee as the only featured metro area with a population of over a million.

The rest of those cities set to fall under US Cellular’s LTE umbrella include Madison and Racine, also in Wisconsin, Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, and Davenport, Iowa, Portland and Bangor, Maine, and Greenville, North Carolina. Texas and Oklahoma will also receive some coverage, but the carrier neglected to specify just which cities it will target.

Source: Android Guys

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!