What Ended Up Happening To The Nokia 600?

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Back in August, before it had Windows Phone hardware to show off, Nokia announced three of its latest Symbian handsets, set to arrive running the latest Belle OS update. The group consisted of the Nokia 600, 700, and 701 models, in ascending order of price. All three were to have 1GHz processors, but with varying screen and storage options. Less than a month later, the Nokia 700 and 701 were shipping out to customers, but the 600 had yet to materialize. With the phone still nowhere to be found, has it run into delays, or possibly been canceled altogether?

We heard of this rumor along with claims that Nokia had whitewashed its online presence to remove any trace of the 600, including its own site and YouTube channel. It turns out that’s not quite true, and we were able to find signs of the 600 on both sites, but it does seem like Nokia may be trying to bury the phone.

For instance, when we heard of the 600 along with the 700 and 701, Nokia uploaded some promotional clips to YouTube. While you can still easily find the videos for the 700 and 701, the 600’s is still on YouTube, but is now unlisted, so you’ll only find it if you know the URL in advance (or have it embedded, as below).

We still found mention of the 600 in Nokia’s support pages, but there’s definitely a current lack of Nokia 600 content on the company’s site, and old URLs to 600-specific pages are now broken. There’s been no formal announcement of a delay or cancellation; until then, the 600’s fate remains up-in-the-air.

Source: DGui

Via: GSM Arena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!