Porsche Design P’9981 BlackBerry Formally Revealed

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Invitations sent out for an event hosted by Porsche Design and RIM had us expecting that the Porsche-designed BlackBerry we’ve been talking about in recent months would make its formal debut. Sure enough, they’ve now revealed the Porsche Design P’9981 smartphone from BlackBerry.

We had heard the smartphone referred to as codename Knight, but mostly as model 9980, which has turned out to be quite close to the final choice (lacking the odd apostrophe, of course). Little’s changed since we last got a look at the handset, but the ever-shifting text that adorns the top has finally settled on something that makes sense: no more “proceeding” or Chinese characters, but “Porsche Design”. This is also the first time we’re seeing the phone rendered with an Arabic keyboard, reflecting the Dubai setting of the launch event.

The phone’s specs tell a familiar tale, revealing Bold 9900-level components including a 1.2GHz processor, 768MB of RAM, and 8GB of flash with the possibility for expansion via microSD. There’s a five-megapixel rear camera, and the handset includes NFC supports.

Software choices for the P’9981 include an exclusive Porsche UI over the base BlackBerry OS 7 installation, as well as a custom Wikitude augmented reality browser. There’s been no word on what the phone might cost, only that it will be coming to Porsche Design stores “later this year”. We also haven’t heard anything new about the BlackBerry 9790, which we were holding-out hope might also see the spotlight today.

Source: Porsche Design

Via: Tracy and Matt

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!