What Else Do You Want on Your Start Screen?

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With Windows Phone 7.5, application developers can make it so that you can pin practically any kind of content directly to your Start screen for easy access. The operating system itself offers lots of options for pinning live tiles to your start screen, too. With the iPhone, you’ve basically got two options for content on your home screen; application icons and web page icons. With Android, your options are a bit more flexibile since you can add application icons, widget applications, web page shortcuts, and contacts to any of a number of home screens.

With Windows Phone 7.5, just within the operating system, you can pin apps, contacts, contact groups, email accounts, linked email accounts (unified inboxes), email account subfolders, map locations, music artists, playlists, music albums, videos, movies, TV shows, podcasts, web pages, Excel, Word, PowerPoint documents, OneNote pages, OneNote Notebooks, SkyDrive or SharePoint Libraries, “New Note” button, and photo albums from Facebook, Windows Live, or phone storage.

Now that 3rd party developers can create options to pin practically any type of content to the start screen, there are even more options. You can pin live tiles of movies coming out that flip over to show their Rotten Tomatoe ratings. You can pin bacon cheeseburger recipies. You can pin live weather radar maps for any number of cities. You can pin ebay searches or products that you want to buy. You can pin navigation locations, frequent Foursquare checkins, What’s App conversations, dinner reservations, plane ticket boarding passes, RSS feeds, individually live updating stock quotes and even specific levels in a game.

What other types of deep-linking live-tiles do you wish you could pin to your start screen?

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About The Author
Adam Z. Lein
Adam has had interests in combining technology with art since his first use of a Koala pad on an Apple computer. He currently has a day job as a graphic designer, photographer, systems administrator and web developer at a small design firm in Westchester, NY. His love of technology extends to software development companies who have often implemented his ideas for usability and feature enhancements. Mobile computing has become a necessity for Adam since his first Uniden UniPro PC100 in 1998. He has been reviewing and writing about smartphones for Pocketnow.com since they first appeared on the market in 2002.Read more about Adam Lein!