Toshiba Builds Retina-Topping LCD Display With Nearly 500 PPI

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The age of 720p smartphone displays is just beginning, with phones like the Galaxy Nexus on the way that will squeeze a high-definition picture down to a portable size. None of us expect the race for higher-and-higher resolutions and denser-and-denser pixel structures to stop now, but where exactly is it heading? Toshiba just announced a new display it’s engineered for portable devices that looks like it could set the bar pretty darn high.

This particular component is a smidge too large for a typical smartphone screen, measuring in at 6.1 inches, which lands it in that buffer zone between smartphones and tablets filled with irregularly-sized devices like the Galaxy Note – the same size range we heard Samsung say would be perfect for mobile devices targeted towards women. We might be more excited if it was a 4.5-inch screen, and for all we know Toshiba is already considering manufacturing a version more along that size.

How many pixels do you think would fit on a 6.1-inch display? Toshiba has managed to cram-in a 2,560 x 1,600 array, far surpassing even 1080p. When that many pixels are on a screen that size, we’re looking at a pixel density of 498ppi. If you thought Apple’s Retina Display was easy on the eyes, this Toshiba tech might just blow your mind. At that resolution, we’re really approaching a place where, even close-up, LCD screens will start to resemble the quality of printed material. Suffice to say, we’re excited to see how Toshiba ends up bringing this display to the mobile market, though that’s almost certainly a long way off.

Source: Toshiba

Via: TechCrunch

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!