Motorola Says RAZR Updating To Ice Cream Sandwich In Early 2012

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After staying up last night to watch the Google/Samsung event, we went to bed as visions of Ice Cream Sandwiches danced in our heads. Today, everyone’s got Android 4.0 on their minds, and for good reason. While plenty of Android fans will be picking up a Galaxy Nexus, if only to be first to the Ice Cream Sandwich party, the rest of us are thinking about updates. We’ve heard that it should be technically possible to release the OS for phones currently capable of running Gingerbread, but whether or not that translates into manufacturers actually doing so (or in a timely manner) remains to be seen. While companies like HTC mull over their upgrade plans, Motorola has revealed that its hot new phone will be getting some Ice Cream Sandwich of its own early next year.

A company exec made the announcement at the RAZR’s European launch event, saying that an OTA upgrade to Android 4.0 will be on its way at the “start of 2012”. It’s not surprising that there’s not a more specific ETA at this point, but from the sounds of things, Motorola is trying to get this one out as soon as possible, so we’ll be cautiously optimistic about seeing it arrive in January or February.

Of course, this is the international RAZR we’re talking about, and not the Droid RAZR as it will be released on Verizon LTE. Motorola hasn’t made any pubic statement about the update’s availability in the States, but we’ve heard it’s definitely on the way – it’s just a question of when.

Source: Pocket-lint

Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!