Sprint Says Network Holding Up Fine Under iPhone Burden; Is It?

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Earlier today, we told you about a number of Sprint subscribers who were complaining about a recent decrease in the speed of their 3G connections, placing the blame squarely on the release of the iPhone 4S for the network. The carrier has since made some public comments regarding the claims, but will that be enough to reassure you?

Sprint was quick to dismiss the broad claims of decreased speed, both pointing out how difficult it is to accurately depict network performance using the momentary measurements of all these speed tests, as well as mentioning reports that claim Sprint’s iPhone 4S is the fastest around. This marks the beginning of a disconnect within Sprint’s comments; it doesn’t seem to be grasping that these complaints are coming from Android users, while Sprint is only talking about iPhone speeds. Then there’s the nature of these speed-test results, which just don’t seem to exist in reality. Sprint mentions Gizmodo, but it hasn’t published anything that shows such a Sprint iPhone bandwidth advantage.

What’s frustrating is that Sprint must know exactly how it’s network is performing, but it doesn’t release such figures itself. Instead, we’re relying on data from third-party tests, while Sprint sits by and points out the flaws in such measurements. At this point, we’re still not sure what to think, but with time will come more data, and hopefully lead to a more complete picture of the state of Sprint’s network post-iPhone.

Source: PCMag

Via: Electronista

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!