MOTOACTV Android-Powered Wristwatch Will Help Get You Fit

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Before getting to the Droid RAZR at today’s event, Motorola’s Sanjay Jha kicked things off by talking fitness and introducing the MOTOACTV Android watch.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen something like this from Motorola, with the Tracy XL appearing in an earlier leak. The MOTOACTV certainly looks a bit different, but the Tracy could very well be the same device earlier in development.

The MOTOACTV is powered by a 600 MHz processor and features a tiny 1.6-inch touchscreen with Gorilla Glass. Taking advantage of on-board sensors like its GPS receiver, the watch lets you capture a whole mess of statistics while you exercise. After a workout, you can upload that data via WiFi to the MOTOACTV website, letting you track your progress. By pairing it with a special Motorola headset, you can even wirelessly monitor your heart rate, adding another valuable data point to that set.

By analyzing how effective your workout is while you listen to certain music, the watch is supposed to be able to learn what tunes motivate you the best, and turn them on when you need a little extra encouragement.

Of course, the watch will be able to sync up with your Android smartphone, giving you call alerts through the watch, and accessing your workout stats through an app. You’ll be able to pick up a MOTOACTV on November 6, at about $250 for an 8GB version, and $300 for 16GB.

Source: Motorola

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!