LG Optimus 3D Game Converter Software About To Arrive

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Having an autostereoscopic 3D display on your smartphone may be at the cutting-edge of handset technology, but it’s only useful so far as you have 3D content to enjoy. Manufacturers were wise to give 3D phones dual cameras, so you can always record some new 3D video in a pinch, but what if you’re looking for some gaming action, instead? Optimus 3D owners will soon have a whole new world of 3D content to explore, with LG just about to release its 3D game converter software.

The app is able to take normal 2D Android games and stretch them out into the third dimension. Apps will have to use Open GL for their graphics calls in order for LG’s converter to work on them, and will have to be playable in landscape mode. Already, we’re running into a lot of limitations, but there are so many Android games to choose from, that even if your first choice to make the leap to 3D doesn’t pan out, you’ve got tons of other options.

Even when it does work, just how effective the conversion is, and how impressive the 3D effect looks, is going to depend a lot on the individual game; we don’t expect all titles will benefit from the move the 3D, but again, there are enough games out there that you should be able to find plenty that do look awesome. LG will optimize the software to work best with certain titles; expect about 50-such presets to be available.

European Optimus 3D owners will start getting the update that includes the converter software any day now. The rest of us will have to wait until later in the month, when LG also plans to release updated video recording and editing software for the Optimus 3D.

Source: Pocket-lint

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!