Samsung Announces 16-Megapixel Image Sensor For Smartphones

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We’ve heard about plans for a 16-megapixel smartphone camera from HTC, one that would end up as a WP7 device, but we’ve yet to see that puppy materialize. Sharp’s AQUOS 007SH features such a sensor, but they’re far from common at the moment. We may be ready to see a whole lot more smartphones step-up their cameras to this kind of megapixel excess, thanks to Samsung’s development of a new 16-megapixel sensor.

Samsung announced its S5K2P1 chip that will bring 16-megapixel performance to stand-alone cameras, camcorders, and most importantly smartphones. The sensor itself is a 1/2.3-inch component and uses backside illumination for extra-low-noise performance. The chip is capable of taking a full-frame, 16-megapixel shot at 30fps, and can handle 60fps video at a still-very-impressive 8.3-megapixel resolution; keep in mind, 1080p video is only 2.1-megapixel.

It’s no secret that there’s a whole lot more contributing to image quality than just megapixel count, and pictures taken with a high-resolution sensor that’s too small, or one that isn’t paired with a good-quality, large lens, will fail to impress. As a result, it’s easy to accuse the manufacturers of these higher-and-higher resolution sensors as just perpetuating the “megapixel myth”, but that’s not entirely fair; so long as we let smartphone companies know that we want handsets with quality optics, in addition to high-res sensors, there’s no reason a 16-megapixel can’t be a welcome addition to a phone.

Source: Samsung

Via: PhoneScoop

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!