Google Optimizing Android For Intel Chips; First Hardware in 2012

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It seems like Intel’s been sitting on the edge of the Android pool for ages now, dangling its feet in the water but never quite getting the nerve to jump on in. We’ve heard about ports of Android that would be optimized for the company’s Atom processors, and manufacturer Aava teases its Intel-powered designs at trade shows year after year, but where’s the commercial product? We’re not quite there yet, but progress is being made. Intel just showed off some Medfield-based hardware running Gingerbread, and announced along with Google the continuation of the partnership between the companies, now set on seeking out further performance gains for Android running on Intel hardware.

The two companies took the stage at this year’s Intel Developer Forum to show off what Intel had been working on. It had a tablet to show off alongside a smartphone, but neither are supposed to represent any actual consumer-bound hardware. For that, we’ll have to wait until next year, when the first Intel-based Androids are expected to arrive.

Andy Rubin explained the future of the partnership, announcing that upcoming Android releases will be available with Intel-optimized code. By taking advantage of features Intel’s built-in to its silicon, the companies should be able to squeeze out as much performance as possible. We’ll have to wait to see just how this hardware will hold up to the standard ARM-based fare.



Source: Intel

Via: ThisIsMyNext

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!