Samsung’s Galaxy S WiFi 3.6 Is An Android Smartphone, Sans Phone

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The just-announced Samsung Note is one of those devices that makes pigeonholing hardware into a nice, neat category a real challenge. With its 5.3-inch screen, should we stop considering it a smartphone, and more a tablet? That handset is just one gadget out of many that walks the tightropes between traditional product families. There’s another just-revealed Samsung that fits that profile as well, but for a different reason altogether.

Samsung’s Galaxy S WiFi 3.6 looks like your average Android smartphone, but lacks a cellular radio, for both voice and data. Like the iPod touch, you’ll have to rely on WiFi access points in order to get the device online. That limitation aside, the GSW isn’t much different from other Galaxy S models – calling it just a “media player” would be a gross understatement. There have been what look like some cost-cutting measures made, like the fact that the main camera has an only two-megapixel resolution. In spite of that, there are also some relatively progressive features, such as the inclusion of a front-facing camera, making the hardware a bit of a contradiction. As you can guess by the name, the handset has a 3.6-inch screen; it will also pack a 1GHz TI processor and arrive running Gingerbread.

Who’s the Galaxy S WiFi 3.6 for? Maybe you’re a die-hard BlackBerry or iPhone user but still want to check out the world of apps available for Android. You don’t need another expensive data plan to worry about, and maybe you’d rather not pick up a used smartphone on Craigslist? If that sounds like you, think about giving the GSW a look-see. It will launch in the UK in 8GB/16GB versions for what works out to $242/275.

Source: Mashable

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!