Is AT&T Thinking About Giving Up On The HTC Status?

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When Microsoft launched its KIN phones last year, we barely had time to react to their presence before Microsoft pulled the plug on the project, deciding to focus all its phone efforts on Windows Phone 7. It’s easy to draw a few comparisons between the KIN line and the recent arrival of Facebook-centric Androids. Besides the emphasis on social networking, there are even some physical similarities, with the HTC Status mirroring the general layout of an opened-up KIN One. Might the Status have a similar fate in store? A new rumor says AT&T may be ready to throw in the towel.

A source TechCrunch calls “trusted” and “close to AT&T” says that the carrier is thinking long and hard about dropping the Status after disappointing sales. AT&T has responded to the rumor, saying, “the HTC Status is a great product and our plans for it to be part of our portfolio haven’t changed,” but would it really admit it was thinking about halting sales before finalizing its decision?

It’s clearly not just social networking that’s the problem, as those apps are popular on other smartphones, and it can’t just be the hardware layout, since it works so well for BlackBerrys. It might be the combination of all these factors, making a smartphone that feels too laser-focused on social features. When you can pick up another Android with a larger, prettier screen, faster processor, and access to plenty of social apps, why settle for what might seem like a one-trick pony?

Source: TechCrunch, BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!