HTC Sensation 4G on T-Mobile Getting Android 2.3.4 Update

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As one of the top-tier smartphones around, it’s no surprise that HTC debuted the Sensation 4G with Android Gingerbread when it was released earlier this summer. Though that’s a strong place to start, there’s always room for more Android updates, and it looks like the latest to come to the Sensation 4G is doing so presently.

Sensation 4G owners on T-Mobile should start receiving notifications that system software 1.45.531.1 is available for installation, bringing the smartphone up slightly to Android 2.3.4.

What will the update bring to the platform? For starters, there’s the usual claim of better system stability, along with a somewhat increased battery life. There are also a handful of graphics-related changes, including improvements to the appearance of icons and a more responsive screen (it’s not clear if we’re talking just about the display, or about more responsive touchscreen input). There’s a curious mention of “improvements to screen/photo resolution”; again, we’re not sure what’s meant here, since software can’t do squat to change the screen’s hardware resolution, but if it makes things look nicer, so much the better.

The Swype-like Trace keyboard gets smarter with a new dictionary, WiFi should be more stable, and some minor bugfixes to video playback and power cycling help round out the update. T-Mobile says that, although distribution has already begun, it could still be several weeks until all users see it arrive. The carrier expects to complete distribution by the end of September.

Source: T-Mobile

Via: Electronista

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!