Details Reveal How BlackBerry Music Relies On Social Networking?

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Since first hearing about RIM’s plans for a subscription music service, we’ve been trying to nail down just how it would operate; was RIM thinking about something more like Spotify or a locker system like Google Music? We heard some rumored details of how it might all work earlier this summer, but now new rumors have emerged that hope to paint a more complete picture.

The concept as it’s been described is a bit odd, and effectively makes building up a decent music library into an exercise in social networking. For $5 a month, you can select 50 songs from RIM’s library to listen to. That doesn’t sound like too great a deal on its own, but as your friends sign-up as well, you can share your songs with them, and vice versa. The more people you know, the more songs you can listen to.

There are some important limitations we don’t yet know about, like how often you can change your selection of 50 songs, or if there’s an upper limit to how many friends you can share your collection with. This also puts some weird pressure on your friends to augment each others’ music libraries; if everyone chooses the same popular songs, there’s little point to sharing, so it almost seems like some conscious strategizing is needed to build up a network of contacts that together shares a diverse music library.

Source: CrackBerry

Via: Electronista

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!