Motorola Confirms Defy Refresh: Defy+ With 1GHz Processor

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Google’s acquisition of Motorola Mobility may be the big news for the manufacturer today, but it’s not the only thing going on in the world of Motorola. Earlier this summer we heard about the possibility of plans to give the ruggedized Defy a hardware refresh, bumping-up processor speed to help the handset compete against this year’s peers. Today the company made the smartphone official, announcing the Defy+.

Just as we had heard, the Defy+ takes the original’s TI OMAP3630 running at 800MHz and swaps that out for a single-core 1GHz processor. Sure, a dual-core would put it on more even footing with some of today’s Androids, but this decision helps keep power consumption low, and hopefully manufacturing costs, as well. Other than the processor upgrade, most of the other phone hardware looks unchanged from the original Defy, though the phone will get a slight battery upgrade to a 1,700mAh model.

The Defy+ will also see new software come to the phone, shipping with Gingerbread installed. When we first looked at the Defy+’s rumored specs, we saw that it was supposed to include radio support for the 850, 1900, and 2100MHz bands. At the time, we were speculating about possible availability in the US, with AT&T support, but according to Motorola, the Defy+ is scheduled to launch only in Asia, Europe and Latin America. Look for it to arrive sometime this fall.

Source: Motorola

Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!