T-Mobile Planning Data Overage Fees For Users On 200MB Plan?

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With unlimited data quickly on the way out of the US (come on, Sprint, let’s keep fighting the good fight), smartphone users who get anxious around the thought of data caps and overage charges may have been flocking to T-Mobile, where they still have some limits to keep in mind, but can at least exceed them and only suffer the consequence of diminished data speeds (though, in our experience, they can turn out QUITE diminished). It was nice while it lasted, at least, since a newly-leaked document shows what appear to be T-Mobile’s plans to introduce overage charges.

According to the doc, this would only affect users signing up for a 200MB plan. Once August 14 rolls around, anyone who wants 200MB of data a month will get that and only that; above 200MB, each megabyte will cost you ten cents (because clearly, it costs T-Mobile the same to transfer two whole megabytes of data as it does one single text message, but that’s a complaint for another day). So that things don’t get too out-of-hand, there will be a $30 or $35 cut-off depending on the plan.

The fact that T-Mobile is doing this for its 200MB plan alone suggests that too many users were signing on for it because of its price, and then consuming more data that T-Mobile was hoping – this notice does say the plan’s popularity “exceeded T-Mobile’s expectations”. This new pricing structure looks to be an effort to close that loophole, and encourage heavier data users into more expensive plans.

Source: TmoNews

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!