Nokia Plans Halting Symbian, Feature Phone Sales In North America

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Nokia recently confirmed that its plans for the N9 don’t include countries like the US or the UK. It explained that its process for deciding which phones see releases in which areas is dependent partially upon what other devices it has or is planning to release there, considering what the repercussions for sales might be if it has multiple phones competing against each other. What we didn’t realize at the time is the full extent of this effort by Nokia to segregate sales of its phones; the company just revealed through the president of its US branch that North America is going WP7-only so far as Nokia is concerned, with no more sales of Symbian, S40, and feature phones.

When discussing the company’s plans to transition from Symbian to Windows Phone 7 as its primary smartphone platform, Stephen Elop’s comments about continued support for Symbian software had us thinking that the company was planning to continue releasing Symbian hardware for at least the next few years. That may be the case for some markets, but North America won’t be among them.

The plan is to make North America the nexus of the company’s future, and that means having laser-focus on Microsoft’s platform. Anything else is a distraction; Nokia seems to realize that selling a bunch of mid-to-low-tier phones isn’t going to keep the company afloat. As far as Windows Phone is concerned, Nokia will design hardware with the North American smartphone user in mind, and then export it to the rest of the world.

It’s a bold move Nokia’s planning to undertake, but it seems to full understand the stakes. As Nokia’s Chris Weber said, “the reality is if we are not successful with Windows Phone, it doesn’t matter what we do.”

Source: All Things Digital

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!