Qualcomm Grouping Snapdragons By Tier For Ease Of Comparison

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When it comes to keeping up with your smartphone lingo, some terminology is much more accessible than the rest. It doesn’t take long to explain to even a layman how 3G is faster than 2G, and 4G faster than both, for instance. Of course, not everything is nearly that straightforward, and the SoCs that power our smartphones are right up there with the worst offenders. Not only are there a bunch of different components that make up an SoC and influence its performance, but it can be a chore to keep up with the differences between each model. Qualcomm would like to do its part to help clear things up, and has announced plans to simplify its model number system by grouping Snapdragon chips into tiers.

In order to make any sense out of the QSD8250 chip, you need to know that it’s a single-core model, is clocked at 1GHz, and includes an Adreno 200 GPU. With Qualcomm’s new system, all you need to know is that the chip is one of its S1 models. While there will still be differences between individual parts within each tier, you can quickly get a sense for where one falls in Qualcomm’s lineup by knowing it’s a S1.

S1 chips will be for lower-end budget phones, with speeds going up to 1GHz. S2 will be the next tier up, covering models up to 1.4GHz, and S3 would right now represent the fastest of the fastest. As chips improve, Qualcomm will need more tiers – S4, for instance, covers the 1.6GHz to 2.4GHz range.

This sounds like a great idea to us; anything that makes it easier for people to get interested in smartphone hardware is a win in our book.

Source: Tech Crunch

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!