Apple Launches iCloud Website Beta, Reveals Pricing Structure

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Apple recently enabled the web-based applications on its iCloud website, giving users access to the new tools. For a brief time, it looked like anyone with an existing account with Apple could access the site, but the company has quickly responded by locking it down to anyone other than developers. Fair enough, and the rest of us will get a shot at it in due time, but more importantly, Apple also revealed just what it will be charging users for access to its cloud services.

iCloud features are taking the place of MobileMe, giving you access to communications tools like Mail, Contacts, and Calendars, as well as the opportunity to back your files up to the cloud. You start off with 5GB of storage, but anything past that will cost you.

An additional 10GB of space, in addition to the free 5GB, will run you $20 a year. That rate of $2/GB/year holds out for the rest of the iCloud pricing, with an extra 20GB costing $40, and 50GB $100.

Granted, you’re getting a lot more with iCloud than just backup, but those rates sound a bit high. For comparison, the automatic cloud-based backup service offered by Mozy will cost you just $72 a year for 50GB of storage. With iCloud, though, you’re paying for the deep integration with iOS and your Mac desktop; we doubt many Apple users will raise much of a stink over these rates.

Source: Electronista

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!