Skyfire VideoQ Lets You Keep Safari And Still Watch Flash Videos

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If you’re hurting for Adobe Flash on an iPhone, you may have already checked out Skyfire’s browser, which transcodes Flash video on Skyfire’s servers before delivering it to you in a format your iPhone can display. What’s a Flash fan to do, though, if you’d rather stick with Safari? Skyfire has just the thing for you, revealing its VideoQ app, which divorces Flash video playback from the company’s web browser.

The way VideoQ works is an interesting approach to the Flash problem, and though it’s far from the most convenient solution we can think of, it may be just right for you, depending on your browsing habits. After buying the $2 app, you register your email address with Skyfire. Then, when you come across a page with a Flash video you’d like to watch, you use Safari’s ability to mail someone the URL to a website to send the link to Skyfire.

The company then matches that incoming email with the address you have on file, its servers download and convert the video in the linked-to page, and the resultant video is added the watch queue in your VideoQ app.

This sounds like way too much work for casual web browsing, but we can see it being useful if you’re going to watch longer content, like TV episodes, or several related clips in a row, taking advantage of the queue.

If that doesn’t seem worth your $2, keep in mind that the VideoQ app contains its own discovery tools, so you can can find and watch video without getting your browser involved at all.

Source: Skyfire

Via: Phone Arena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!