Atom-Powered Fujitsu F-07C Runs Windows 7 (Not WP7)

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Want to really confuse your smartphone-saavy friends? Show up with Fujitsu’s just-announced F-07C Windows 7 phone. “You mean Windows Phone 7, right?” The mobile OS may be Microsoft’s focus when it comes to smartphones, but that’s not stopping Fujitsu from cramming a full-blown Windows 7 install into a pretty-much-normal-sized handset.

The hardware on this QWERTY slider, headed to NTT Docomo in Japan, would be right at home on a netbook; there’s a 1.2GHz Atom CPU, a gig of RAM, and 32GB of flash storage. The F-07C runs Windows 7 Home Premium and features a 4-inch LCD at 1024 x 600. Since this is still a smartphone, after all, look for a 5.1-megapixel rear camera and a VGA front-facer.

Weighing-in at 218 grams and measuring just under 20 millimeters thick, the F-07C is slightly bulkier than your average smartphone, but the versatility and huge software library it offers should more than make up for its size. Who cares about mobile Flash Player when you can just install the real thing? Running Windows 7 does come at a cost, though, with the smartphone’s battery only packing enough juice for about two hours of Windows action before it calls it quits. That may put a big dent in its utility, but there’s little denying that this looks like one heck of an impressive smartphone. It will be out in Japan later this week – no word on price.

Source: Fujitsu

Via: WinRumors

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!