Nokia Promises N9 Software Updates, Years Of Support To Come

Advertisement

With Nokia in a transitional phase right now, winding down Symbian production as it transitions to Windows Phone 7 as its primary smartphone platform, the company’s been going to some lengths to reassure its customers that no one’s going to be abandoned in the aftermath of this shift. So far, we’ve heard plenty of assurances directed at Symbian users, letting them know that they still have many years of support before Nokia’s done with Symbian, once and for all. Despite this, Nokia hasn’t been so convincing when it comes to non-Symbian devices like the recently-announced N9. To the contrary, the company said that it had no further MeeGo plans past the N9, effectively making the phone and its platform seem dead in the water. Things may not be so bleak, after all, with Nokia employees now speaking out in favor of the N9, promising years of software support.

Nokia’s Head of Portfolio Management, Klas Ström, must have been noticing the growing cloud of uncertainty surrounding the N9, and turned to Twitter to set the record straight. According to him, the N9 is not about to be swept under the rug, and Nokia will continue to offer support for the phone for years to come. That means not just warranty service and tech support, but plans to release several software updates for the N9, just as we’d expect to see for any smartphone on a more popular OS. The jury’s out on just how many potential customers are still considering the phone, but Ström’s words may be enough to change a few minds in Nokia’s favor.

Source: Klas Ström

Via: Electronista

Share This Post
Advertisement
What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!