Reborn Motorola Droid Bionic Stars In Its First Ad

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The long, troubled road that would bring the Motorola Droid Bionic to market is nearing its last leg; after heading back to the shop for re-tooling, the smartphone has reemerged, putting in an FCC appearance, and showing up in a few blurrycam photos. We’ve also heard about a rumored release date, leaving one of the last missing pieces of the puzzle to be some official promotional material for the newly-reborn Android. Well, speak of the devil, because This Is My Next just got its hands on a Best Buy flyer for the Droid Bionic.

In one of the more aggressive promotions we’ve seen, the flyer plays-up the “ferocious force” afforded by Verizon’s LTE network, and calls the Bionic an “unstoppable machine”; well, unstoppable by anything other than lengthy pre-release delays, perhaps.

The ad’s image of the Bionic, the first professional-quality shot we’ve seen of the smartphone since its re-design, matches the photos that have come out thus far. Oddly, there’s no mention of the Bionic’s great big 4.5-inch qHD display we’ve heard rumored, something we thought would be one of its main selling points. There’s also no mention of support for Motorola’s laptop dock, which we’ve seen the Bionic linked to. So, while we’re glad that the Bionic’s finally about to see the light of day, it already feels like it’s being mis-promoted; after all this time, could Verizon (and its retail partner Best Buy) bungle the launch? It’s still a little month before we expect sales to begin, so we’ve got plenty of time to find out.

Source: This Is My Next

Via: MobileCrunch

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!