Bloomberg Adds to iPhone Rumor Pile: Sept. Release, Spec-Bumped

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While September has been the most talked-about target for when Apple’s next iPhone will arrive, not everyone’s been in agreement; just yesterday, we considered a rumor that the smartphone could show up in August and would be a significant departure from the iPhone 4, rather than a small spec upgrade. While there’s no new evidence to suggest that will or won’t be the case, Bloomberg is throwing its journalistic weight behind sources that both point us back at a September release, as well as suggest that, once again, we’ll be getting something more iPhone 4S than iPhone 5.

Once again, we’re hearing that the next iPhone will use the iPad 2’s A5 processor for dual-core performance, and that Apple will bump the smartphone’s camera up from five to eight megapixels. That’s nothing we haven’t heard before, but the repetition of these rumors, especially if they’re coming from different sources, is starting to give them the impression of credence.

What is notable is what’s not mentioned: any radical changes to the iPhone’s shell. That possibility has been linked to rumors of the iPhone 5, but everything that’s been focused on a spec-bumped iPhone 4S has it maintaining the same basic design as the iPhone 4 (though with possibly a larger screen). Bloomberg’s sources say the coming model “will closely resemble the iPhone 4”.

Also a possibility: a reduced-size (and presumably, cost) model using iPhone 4 tech for developing countries. Again, we’ve heard this sort of thing before, but could that be because there’s something to it?

Source: Bloomberg

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!