Apple Bringing Multi-App Installs, Call Security Warning to iOS 5

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Developers working on readying their apps for Apple’s iOS 5 continue to make discoveries of the many changes and new features coming to iOS that Apple has yet to draw attention to. Two of the latest to be discovered include an improvement to the app installation process, and one that could notify you of security threats.

Apple’s getting a lot of flack for ripping of other operating systems with many of the changes in iOS 5, such as the Android-like notification system. The latest tweak to app installation isn’t going to do anything to reduce that list of “borrowed” features, since reportedly iOS can now install multiple applications at once. That means you’ll be able to select a bunch in Apple’s App Store and watch as they download and install simultaneously, rather than waiting for one to complete before the next in queue begins. A minor change, sure, but since multi-tasking’s available, why not make use of it?

When making a voice call, iOS will now want you if the cellular network your connected to isn’t properly encrypted. Many users don’t realize that there are multiple encryption options for voice calls, with the cellular tower and your phone negotiating which they’ll use when making a connection. Without a system like this to warn you, you might never know your call was insecure. Don’t worry about running into this problem too much in developed countries, but infrastructure issues and rogue, malicious cell stations can introduce this hazard in some areas. Better safe than sorry, we figure.

Look for more iOS 5 features to come to light as developers get more experience using the operating system.

Source: TiPb, mobiputing

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!