Microsoft Ending Windows Mobile Marketplace Web Store, My Phone

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With Windows Phone 7 firmly established as Microsoft’s new smartphone platform, the days of legacy Windows Mobile 6.x devices have long been numbered. While models like HTC’s HD2 continue to perform, developers are concentrating their efforts on apps for current platforms. We heard a few weeks ago that Microsoft might be planning to finally start wrapping up the Windows Mobile Marketplace, no longer accepting submissions of new apps after mid-July. Now the company has confirmed more details of its plan, including the dissolution of the Windows Mobile Marketplace web presence and shutting down My Phone.

As of July 15, you’ll no longer be able to find any WinMo 6.x apps in the Marketplace online. You’ll still be able to access the store from your smartphone, but Microsoft’s web presence will only cover WP7 apps from that point forward. The company will likely phase out even that access in the future, after more 6.x users feel the need to transition to a WP7 device.

Microsoft is also closing up shop on My Phone, its online service including backup and storage functions. Some files you have stored with My Phone will automatically be moved to SkyDrive, including your contacts, calendar entries, text messages and photos. Don’t count on that process grabbing everything, though, as it will leave behind videos, music, documents, and favorites that you’ve saved, which you’ll no longer have access to. This transition will begin on August 7, so act before then if you want to make sure all your My Phone stuff gets saved.

Source: Microsoft

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!