AT&T LG Thrill 4G Finally Shows Up At FCC

Advertisement

The Thrill 4G on AT&T will be the first one of the first opportunities for smartphone users in the States to check out a handset with a no-glasses-required 3D screen. While Sharp’s 3D models and the LG Optimus 3D – the Thrill 4G without carrier branding – are already available, this AT&T launch will finally help (along with the HTC EVO 3D) get one of these devices out into the hands of smartphone users and give us an indication if the 3D screen fad will take off in the US.

We’ve been keeping our eyes on FCC filings, to get an idea on the progress being made towards the Thrill’s release, and first saw it appear in March as the original Optimus 3D. Then, in April, a similar model showed up, now with support for AT&T’s 3G bands. Today, yet another variant on the smartphone saw its paperwork published, finally sporting the model number that identifies it as the Thrill 4G on AT&T.

The first time the Optimus 3D was identified as LG model number P920. For its return in April, it became the LG P920H. While that model certainly could pass as the Thrill 4G on AT&T, it may instead be an Optimus 3D poised for release on the Canadian carriers. Today’s smartphone is the LG P925, which we’re able to confirm through AT&T’s developer site as the number reserved for the Thrill 4G.

Other than the model number change, this looks to be the same device we saw go through the FCC in April. Now that the Thrill 4G is done with this FCC formality, hopefully we’ll be learning of a release date soon. We’d certainly expect to see the phone launch sometime before fall.

Source: FCC

Share This Post
Advertisement
What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!