Nokia Has A Working WP7 Prototype; CEO Elop Carries One On Him

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We’ve heard that Nokia has two Windows Phone 7 smartphones in the works: one standard slate and one with a hardware keyboard. With plans to get them out to customers by the end of the year, we’d expect the deadline to be putting extra pressure on the company’s engineers, already having to adapt to developing hardware for an unfamiliar platform. Apparently they’re taking to the challenge like fish to water, already churning out a working model that’s become a daily-carry phone for CEO Stephen Elop.

Elop mentioned his personal WP7 handset in an interview with Businessweek, saying, “I’ve got a working Windows Phone in my pocket now, and it’s been less than three months since we began working with Microsoft. We’re moving at a speed that’s faster than Nokia has ever moved before.”

The smartphone may have come up again when Elop sat down for another interview at the D9 conference. He remarked that he likes to carry “all forms of innovative hardware at all times” before pulling out a phone to share a glimpse of with the crowd. This time he didn’t name the handset specifically as one of the WP7 models Nokia is working on, but a man only has so many pockets – there’s a decent chance this was the model Elop spoke to BW about, especially considering his unwillingness to give anyone a better look at it.

There’s still months and months to go before we’ll see Nokia’s Windows Phone creations arrive at carriers, but it’s reassuring to see that this first attempt at working with the OS seems to be well on it way.

Source: Businessweek, My Nokia Blog

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!