Mozy Releases Android App for Accessing Backups Remotely

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Paranoid about losing your data? Whether it happens due to theft, fire, hardware failure, or act of god, once your data’s gone, you’ll be kicking yourself for not backing it up. For some users that can mean copying files to a removable hard drive, but others choose to keep their data on remote servers. One service offering that kind of remote backup is Mozy, which can automatically keep your Windows or Mac computer backed-up to its cloud. Previously offering an iPhone app to monitor and access your backups, Mozy has just launched an Android version of the same management software.

Just like Google Music Beta can do for your music collection, letting you upload it and access it remotely via your smartphone, Mozy can pull the same trick with any file on your computer. Once its software automatically uploads them to Mozy’s servers, the app will let you view your photos, or download documents directly to your smartphone.

There are a couple caveats to keep in mind, like this only works with the MozyHome service and not MozyPro at the moment (Pro is business-targeted, for enterprise-level backups), you have to live in the US, Canada, Mexico, or Brazil, and it doesn’t support private encryption keys. Your files are still encrypted with the default options; this just means you can’t specify your own private key.

The Mozy app for Android is now in the Android Market, and the iPhone version continues to be available through Apple’s App Store.

Source: Mozy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!