HTC ChaCha Passes FCC, Eventually En Route to AT&T

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HTC’s ChaCha will be, along with the HTC Salsa, one of the manufacturer’s first smartphones with hardware Facebook buttons for quick access to social networking functions. We’ve been seeing quite a bit about the phone’s launch in Europe, with pre-orders already in play, counting down to a June 26 release. On the other side of the Atlantic, things have been relatively quiet for the phone, short of a speculative lawsuit trying to prevent the ChaCha name from being used in the States. Today, the FCC has published HTC’s documentation covering the testing of the European version of the smartphone, and we’ve found some evidence furthering the suggestion that the ChaCha will end up on AT&T in the US, though perhaps under a different name.

Unsurprisingly, the ChaCha the FCC paperwork discusses has no support for US 3G bands. It’s identified as model PH06110; we believe that the PH06 series of HTC devices will encompass all regional ChaCha variants. Another one, PH06130, has the markings to be the model that will make it to the US on AT&T, though we haven’t yet seen this one make an appearance in FCC filings.

chachaspecs


The ChaCha won’t blow anyone away with its hardware, consisting of a 600MHz CPU and a 2.6-inch HVGA screen (at least that beats the Vodafone Smart’s), but its the software package that has a shot and making the smartphone an attractive purchase. If you don’t care about Quadrant scores or processing power, the QWERTY keyboard along with all the Facebook integration could make this a heck of a messaging phone. It could end up making it to AT&T by sometime in Q3.

Source: FCC

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!