Toshiba LTPS Displays Promise 720p Smartphone Screens @ 367ppi

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Toshiba is stepping up its game when it comes to mobile displays, announcing a series of Low Temperature Poly-Silicon screens that will be available in pixel densities up to a Retina-Display-trumping 367ppi, which it intends to show off at the Society for Information Display International Symposium this week.

These LTPS screens will come in several configurations, but we’re most interested in the high-end figures. That means a four-inch screen with a proper 720p, 1280 x 720 resolution capable of showing unscaled HD content. This series of LTPS components will range in size from 3.3 to 4.0 inches, also available in lower resolutions for devices that don’t need the extra pixels. All of these are expected to feature an impressive contrast ratio of 1500:1, once again outdoing the Retina Display. Apple has said its screen has a contrast of 800:1, and though tests have rated it even slightly above that, it’s still far short of what Toshiba is promising.

Beyond the ridiculous pixel densities, Toshiba intents to show off some other display tech it’s been working on, like a capacitive touch-sensing system that’s built-in to LTPS screens, and its own no-glasses-required 3D systems. One of those 3D techs it will be demoing sounds particularly impressive, supposedly avoiding the narrow viewing angle restraint found in today’s systems. At this stage, Toshiba hasn’t made any revelations about when we could hope to see any of these screens in an actual smartphone, but we’ll certainly be looking forward to that announcement.

Source: Toshiba

Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!