LG enV Pro Finally Heading to US Cellular as LG Genesis

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We’ve been trying to wrap our heads around what’s to become of the LG enV Pro for months now. It first looked like it’d be going to Verizon, but after a less-than-sunny reception, the phone seemed to be shelved. It just didn’t go away, though, popping up in Cellebrite’s data-transfer system and later at the FCC, now attached to rumors that both Verizon and US Cellular were thinking about carrying the Android smartphone. After another lull, the enV Pro is back with a new name, now the LG Genesis, and reportedly heading to US Cellular soon.

The Genesis may have taken so long to snag carrier interest due to its odd form-factor. It’s a dual-screen Android, but a landscape-orientation clamshell, with one screen on the outside and one inside with the QWERTY keyboard. While this simplifies things (vs the Kyocera Echo), since you won’t be using both screens at once, it seems positively wasteful when compared to a more traditional QWERTY slider. You also have to put up with a smaller internal screen, at only 3.2 inches, with a 3.5-inch screen outside; both displays are in WVGA resolution.

While it may look a little odd, the Genesis has some decent specs, running Android 2.2 on a 1GHz Snapdragon, with a five-megapixel camera and a 1500 mAh battery. They’re certainly not top-of-the-line, but definitely a step above a budget Android. There’s no word yet on pricing or a release date, and though the enV’s release had started to move into the we’ll-believe-it-when-we-see-it category, we’re optimistic that it’ll finally see the light of day.

Source: Android Central

Via: Phandroid

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!