T-Mobile Retracts G2x Quad-Band 4G Claims; No AT&T Support

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As T-Mobile prepared to launch the LG Optimus 2X on its network in the US as the G2x, we were excited to learn that it looked like the carrier-branded smartphone would actually improve upon the original, adding in extra support for additional 4G bands, setting the G2x up for compatibility with T-Mobile, AT&T, and European networks on the 2100MHz band. T-Mobile’s website has been saying so, anyway, for the past month. Turns out it’s all a big typo that T-Mobile never thought to correct, and there’s no support for AT&T broadband, after all.

It wasn’t until sales of the G2x actually started and customers tried configuring their phones for AT&T that T-Mobile was forced to admit it made a mistake. While a fact sheet on the G2x did accurately state its supported frequencies, are most users going to download a PDF full of phone info, or go by what’s listed on the carrier’s website? T-Mobile has recently corrected the information, but until now it had been unambiguously stating that the G2x would support HSPA+ on the AWS band (T-Mobile’s 1700MHz), as well as 850, 1900, and 2100MHz.

With the recent move by AT&T to acquire T-Mobile, the quad-band 4G made all the more sense, apparently readying the phone in advance for the purchase (assuming the FCC gives the nod to OK the new duopoly). There are no doubt some new G2x owners who bought the phone with this broad compatibility in mind, so we’re hoping T-Mobile has a better apology in store than the curt brush-off Engadget received when reaching out to the carrier for comment. Considering the quad-band-4G story widely circulated over a month ago, it’s just embarrassing for the carrier to have gone ahead with the phone’s launch, with this bad information still public.

Source: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!