Samsung TouchWiz 4 Ripped For Galaxy S

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Samsung’s Galaxy S 2 isn’t even launching until next week, but that hasn’t stopped the lucky few who have access to the smartphone pre-release from ripping some goodies from it. Over the weekend, the phone’s live wallpapers were extracted, ready for use on other Androids with WVGA displays. Now the whole shebang has been ripped, letting you install the brand new TouchWiz 4 interface on an original Galaxy S.

TouchWiz 4 builds on 3 with new gesture controls, using input from the phone’s sensors in addition to the touchscreen to let you manipulate in more natural ways. For instance, moving the phone towards or away from you, as detected by the smartphone’s accelerometer, can be used to control screen zoom. Gestures can now also affect how you manipulate widgets and the home screen, flipping through screens with a shake of the wrist.

To get started playing around with TouchWiz 4, you’ll need a Galaxy S running a deodoxed JVB Gingerbread ROM. After copying over the ripped files and clearing your cache, TouchWiz 3 should be replaced with the latest edition. There’s been limited success with other ROMs, but starting from a clean, stock ROM seems to lead to the most success. While some users report nothing more troubling than a slightly longer boot period, others are getting FCs or losing their notification bar. As such, keep in mind this is very much a work-in-progress if you decide to experiment with it.

Source: XDA-Developers forum

Thanks: Anonymous Coward

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!